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Unveiling Damnatio Memoriae. The use of 3D digital technologies for the virtual reconstruction of archaeological finds and artefacts

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Unveiling Damnatio Memoriae. The use of 3D digital technologies for the virtual reconstruction of archaeological finds and artefacts

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dc.contributor.author Manferdini, Anna Maria es_ES
dc.contributor.author Gasperoni, Sofia es_ES
dc.contributor.author Guidi, Federica es_ES
dc.contributor.author Marchesi, Marinella es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-05T10:02:15Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-05T10:02:15Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-15
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10251/80652
dc.description.abstract [EN] In ancient Rome, damnatio memoriae was a practice of erasing the memory of condemned persons from historical records after their death. This practice was usually addressed by the Senate to Roman elites and emperors who were declared enemies of the State, in order to preserve the honour of Rome. This condemnation usually included practices such as, for example, the erasure of names sculpted on inscriptions and the destruction or reworking of statues and of any other image of the person. Emperor Nero, for example, was condemned to this practice immediately after his death and a wide iconographic repertoire on him was therefore destroyed or deeply damaged. This lack of information can actually be improved thanks to the possibilities of virtual restoration and reconstruction offered by 3D digital technologies.The aim of this paper is to show how the possibility to acquire 3D reality-based data from archaeological finds allows to build 3D digital models that can be analysed and managed in a virtual environment and can be relocated, assembled or restored in order to suggest or graphically support archaeologists’ interpretations and reconstructions. The paper shows the methodology developed for the virtual restoration of the statue of Nero starting from the 3D digitization of the torso that was found 500 years ago by the Roman theatre of Bologna, Italy, the ancient Bononia. es_ES
dc.language Inglés es_ES
dc.publisher Universitat Politècnica de València
dc.relation.ispartof Virtual Archaeology Review
dc.rights Reconocimiento - No comercial - Sin obra derivada (by-nc-nd) es_ES
dc.subject 3D reality-based survey es_ES
dc.subject 3D sculpturing es_ES
dc.subject 3D modelling es_ES
dc.subject Virtual reconstruction es_ES
dc.subject Virtual archaeology es_ES
dc.subject Nero es_ES
dc.title Unveiling Damnatio Memoriae. The use of 3D digital technologies for the virtual reconstruction of archaeological finds and artefacts es_ES
dc.type Artículo es_ES
dc.date.updated 2017-05-05T09:50:22Z
dc.identifier.doi 10.4995/var.2016.5871
dc.rights.accessRights Abierto es_ES
dc.description.bibliographicCitation Manferdini, AM.; Gasperoni, S.; Guidi, F.; Marchesi, M. (2016). Unveiling Damnatio Memoriae. The use of 3D digital technologies for the virtual reconstruction of archaeological finds and artefacts. Virtual Archaeology Review. 7(15):9-17. doi:10.4995/var.2016.5871. es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversion https://doi.org/10.4995/var.2016.5871 es_ES
dc.description.upvformatpinicio 9 es_ES
dc.description.upvformatpfin 17 es_ES
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion es_ES
dc.description.volume 7
dc.description.issue 15
dc.identifier.eissn 1989-9947


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