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Effects of Fe-EDDHA Chelate Application on Evolution of Soil Extractable Iron, Copper, Manganese and Zinc

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Effects of Fe-EDDHA Chelate Application on Evolution of Soil Extractable Iron, Copper, Manganese and Zinc

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dc.contributor.author Gil-Ortiz, Ricardo es_ES
dc.contributor.author Bautista, Inmaculada es_ES
dc.date.accessioned 2020-12-05T04:31:54Z
dc.date.available 2020-12-05T04:31:54Z
dc.date.issued 2004-02 es_ES
dc.identifier.issn 0010-3624 es_ES
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10251/156494
dc.description.abstract [EN] Up to date, soil application of synthetic chelates is the most effective mean of controlling iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis in many crops. The responses of three representative soils (I, II, and III) of a large orchard area (Ribbra Alta del Jucar) to the application of three commercial Fe-EDDHA chelates (Sequestrene 138 Fe G-100, Group Carla Val F.E.A 6 Superior and Ferrishell plus) at 100 (D1) and 200 mug Fe/kg of soil (132) were analyzed. Extractable concentrations of Fe, copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) were determined at 7, 14, 21, 42, and 71 days after the application. Data were subjected to multifactor ANOVA to analyze the effects of time, dose, soil, and chelate type on Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn concentrations. Soil type affected the recovery percentage of Fe by DTPA extraction. The extractable Fe increased to 40-60 mg Fe/kg of soil by the D1 dose and to 70-100 mg Fe/kg of soil by the D2 dose for soils I and II. However, in the case of soil III, recovery increased to 60-80 mg Fe/kg of soil for D1 and 100-140 mg Fe/kg of soil for D2. As the pH of the three soils was similar, this recovery difference is attributed to the differing textural compositions of the soils. The extractable concentrations of Fe increased In the sandy loam soil in contrast to-the clay loam soils. The Fe-EDDHA formula did not affect significantly, extractable Fe concentration. Increases in-the extract able Cu and Mn were observed after Fe-EDDHA soil application. These increases could be due to changes in the redox potential that alters the form and solubility of some metals, possibly affecting the metal-chelate equilibrium. In the case of Zn, the variation in Zn concentration is hardly appreciable, with Fe preventing effective Zn chelation. No difference in effectiveness has been found between the Fe-EDDHA formula brands used in this experiment. es_ES
dc.language Inglés es_ES
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis es_ES
dc.relation.ispartof Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis es_ES
dc.rights Reserva de todos los derechos es_ES
dc.subject Fe-EDDHA chelate es_ES
dc.subject Extractability es_ES
dc.subject Calcareous soils es_ES
dc.subject Micronutrients es_ES
dc.subject.classification EDAFOLOGIA Y QUIMICA AGRICOLA es_ES
dc.title Effects of Fe-EDDHA Chelate Application on Evolution of Soil Extractable Iron, Copper, Manganese and Zinc es_ES
dc.type Artículo es_ES
dc.identifier.doi 10.1081/CSS-120029732 es_ES
dc.relation.projectID info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/UPV//PPI-6-00 7145/ es_ES
dc.rights.accessRights Abierto es_ES
dc.contributor.affiliation Universitat Politècnica de València. Instituto Universitario Mixto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas - Institut Universitari Mixt de Biologia Molecular i Cel·lular de Plantes es_ES
dc.contributor.affiliation Universitat Politècnica de València. Departamento de Química - Departament de Química es_ES
dc.description.bibliographicCitation Gil-Ortiz, R.; Bautista, I. (2004). Effects of Fe-EDDHA Chelate Application on Evolution of Soil Extractable Iron, Copper, Manganese and Zinc. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 35(3-4):559-570. https://doi.org/10.1081/CSS-120029732 es_ES
dc.description.accrualMethod S es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversion https://doi.org/10.1081/CSS-120029732 es_ES
dc.description.upvformatpinicio 559 es_ES
dc.description.upvformatpfin 570 es_ES
dc.type.version info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion es_ES
dc.description.volume 35 es_ES
dc.description.issue 3-4 es_ES
dc.relation.pasarela S\25919 es_ES
dc.contributor.funder Universitat Politècnica de València es_ES
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