- -

Documenting atrocities around the world: Why engage with the perpetrators?

RiuNet: Institutional repository of the Polithecnic University of Valencia

Share/Send to

Cited by

Statistics

Documenting atrocities around the world: Why engage with the perpetrators?

Show full item record

Canet Centellas, FJ. (2019). Documenting atrocities around the world: Why engage with the perpetrators?. International Journal of Cultural Studies. 22(6):804-822. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367877919840042

Por favor, use este identificador para citar o enlazar este ítem: http://hdl.handle.net/10251/157587

Files in this item

Item Metadata

Title: Documenting atrocities around the world: Why engage with the perpetrators?
Author: Canet Centellas, Fernando Javier
UPV Unit: Universitat Politècnica de València. Departamento de Comunicación Audiovisual, Documentación e Historia del Arte - Departament de Comunicació Audiovisual, Documentació i Història de l'Art
Issued date:
Abstract:
[EN] Following a century filled with violations of human rights, a significant number of documentary films have appeared since the first decade of the current century that report these events. Traditionally this process ...[+]
Subjects: Crimes against humanity , Documentary film , Genocide , Human rights , Malte Ludin , Errol Morris , Joshua Oppenheimer , Lissette Orozco , Perpetrator , Reconciliation
Copyrigths: Reserva de todos los derechos
Source:
International Journal of Cultural Studies. (issn: 1367-8779 )
DOI: 10.1177/1367877919840042
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/1367877919840042
Thanks:
This research has been carried out at University of Kent (UK) thanks to a mobility grant financed by the Spanish government.
Type: Artículo

References

Austin, T. (2011). Standard Operating Procedure, «the mystery of photography» and the politics of pity. Screen, 52(3), 342-357. doi:10.1093/screen/hjr021

Bandura, A. (1999). Moral Disengagement in the Perpetration of Inhumanities. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 3(3), 193-209. doi:10.1207/s15327957pspr0303_3

BARCUS, R. A., & BERNSTEIN, B. G. (1997). Victim-Perpetrator Reconciliation. Violence Against Women, 3(5), 515-532. doi:10.1177/1077801297003005005 [+]
Austin, T. (2011). Standard Operating Procedure, «the mystery of photography» and the politics of pity. Screen, 52(3), 342-357. doi:10.1093/screen/hjr021

Bandura, A. (1999). Moral Disengagement in the Perpetration of Inhumanities. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 3(3), 193-209. doi:10.1207/s15327957pspr0303_3

BARCUS, R. A., & BERNSTEIN, B. G. (1997). Victim-Perpetrator Reconciliation. Violence Against Women, 3(5), 515-532. doi:10.1177/1077801297003005005

Bar-Siman-Tov, Y. (2004). Introduction: Why Reconciliation? From Conflict Resolution to Reconciliation, 3-10. doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195166439.003.0001

Bies, R. J., & Tripp, T. M. (s. f.). Beyond Distrust: «Getting Even» and the Need for Revenge. Trust in Organizations: Frontiers of Theory and Research, 246-260. doi:10.4135/9781452243610.n12

Borer, T. A. (2003). A Taxonomy of Victims and Perpetrators: Human Rights and Reconciliation in South Africa. Human Rights Quarterly, 25(4), 1088-1116. doi:10.1353/hrq.2003.0039

Crichlow, W. (2013). «It’s All About Finding the Right Excuse» in Joshua Oppenheimer’s The Act of Killing. Film Quarterly, 67(2), 37-43. doi:10.1525/fq.2014.67.2.37

Crownshaw, R. (2011). Perpetrator Fictions and Transcultural Memory. Parallax, 17(4), 75-89. doi:10.1080/13534645.2011.605582

Darby, B. W., & Schlenker, B. R. (1982). Children’s reactions to apologies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 43(4), 742-753. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.43.4.742

Dunnage, J. (2010). Perpetrator memory and memories about perpetrators. Memory Studies, 3(2), 91-94. doi:10.1177/1750698009355672

Elizur, Y., & Yishay-Krien, N. (2009). Participation in Atrocities Among Israeli Soldiers During the First Intifada: A Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Peace Research, 46(2), 251-267. doi:10.1177/0022343308100718

Jansen, S. (2013). If Reconciliation Is the Answer, Are We Asking the Right Questions? Studies in Social Justice, 7(2), 229-243. doi:10.26522/ssj.v7i2.1045

Mann, M. (2000). Were the Perpetrators of Genocide «Ordinary Men» or «Real Nazis»? Results from Fifteen Hundred Biographies. Holocaust and Genocide Studies, 14(3), 331-366. doi:10.1093/hgs/14.3.331

Morag, R. (2012). Perpetrator Trauma and Current Israeli Documentary Cinema. Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies, 27(2), 93-133. doi:10.1215/02705346-1597222

Morag, R. (2013). Waltzing with Bashir. doi:10.5040/9780755693931

Nichols, B. (2013). Irony, Cruelty, Evil (and a Wink) in The Act of Killing. Film Quarterly, 67(2), 25-29. doi:10.1525/fq.2014.67.2.25

Ohbuchi, K., Kameda, M., & Agarie, N. (1989). Apology as aggression control: Its role in mediating appraisal of and response to harm. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 56(2), 219-227. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.56.2.219

Pettitt, J. (2017). Perpetrators in Holocaust Narratives. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-52575-4

Rouhana, N. N. (2004). Group identity and power asymmetry in reconciliation processes: The Israeli-Palestinian case. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 10(1), 33-52. doi:10.1207/s15327949pac1001_3

Schaap, A. (2004). Political Reconciliation. doi:10.4324/9780203002773

Schliesser, C. (2017). The Politics of Reconciliation in Post-genocide Rwanda. Alternative Approaches in Conflict Resolution, 137-146. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-58359-4_13

Shnabel, N., & Nadler, A. (2008). A needs-based model of reconciliation: Satisfying the differential emotional needs of victim and perpetrator as a key to promoting reconciliation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(1), 116-132. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.94.1.116

Staub, E. (2000). Genocide and Mass Killing: Origins, Prevention, Healing and Reconciliation. Political Psychology, 21(2), 367-382. doi:10.1111/0162-895x.00193

Staub, E. (2006). Reconciliation after Genocide, Mass Killing, or Intractable Conflict: Understanding the Roots of Violence, Psychological Recovery, and Steps toward a General Theory. Political Psychology, 27(6), 867-894. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9221.2006.00541.x

[-]

recommendations

 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record