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The language of topology: a Turkish case study

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Barton, B.; Lichtenberk, F.; Reilly, IL. (2005). The language of topology: a Turkish case study. Applied General Topology. 6(2):107-117. doi:10.4995/agt.2005.1950.

Por favor, use este identificador para citar o enlazar este ítem: http://hdl.handle.net/10251/82629

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Title: The language of topology: a Turkish case study
Author: Barton, Bill Lichtenberk, Frank Reilly, Ivan
Issued date:
Abstract:
[EN] Topology has its own specialised language. Where did this come from? What are the differences in the language of topology when it is expressed in English, Spanish, Mandarin, Czech or Turkish? Does topology itself ...[+]
Subjects: Language and topology , Open , Connected
Copyrigths: Reconocimiento - No comercial - Sin obra derivada (by-nc-nd)
Source:
Applied General Topology. (issn: 1576-9402 ) (eissn: 1989-4147 )
DOI: 10.4995/agt.2005.1950
Publisher:
Universitat Politècnica de València
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.4995/agt.2005.1950
Thanks:
The research reported in this paper has been funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Research, Science & Technology Marsden Fund and the University of Auckland Research Committee
Type: Artículo

References

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B. Barton and I. Reilly, Topological Concepts and Language: A Report of Research in Progress, Notices of the South African Mathematical Society 30(2) (1999), 110-119.

T. Dale and G. Cuevas, Integrating Language and Mathematics Learning, in J. Crandall (ed) ESL Through Content-Area Instruction, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall Regents (1987), 9-52. [+]
B. Barton and R. Frank, Mathematical Ideas and Indigenous Languages: The extent to which culturally-specific mathematical thinking is carried through the language in which it takes place, in B. Atweh, H. Forgasz & B. Nebres (Eds) Sociocultural Research in Mathematics Education: An International Perspective, Mahwah, NJ:Lawrence Erlbaum Associates (2001), 135-149.

B. Barton and I. Reilly, Topological Concepts and Language: A Report of Research in Progress, Notices of the South African Mathematical Society 30(2) (1999), 110-119.

T. Dale and G. Cuevas, Integrating Language and Mathematics Learning, in J. Crandall (ed) ESL Through Content-Area Instruction, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall Regents (1987), 9-52.

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